Ian R Holman
Through my method of working, I try to capitalize on a variety of associations that may come about during the process of making a particular painting. I start out on a painting with a set of basic defining materials: Type of surface, shape and size of surface and what material will be applied on that surface. As I begin to work with the materials I attempt to define certain opposing points that develop in the painting. These issues—such as material/immaterial, painted space/physical space, cohesion/disruption—put into motion a process of associations that informs the painted process. It is the material properties of painting and how these properties interrupt and contradict each other that allow the various random associations to play a formative role in the overall meaning and structure of the painting. The process of associations is not only located in the paintings composition but also externally, the physical interaction between the painting and the surrounding space, allowing me to approach the installation as a site-specific project.
These associations allow the paintings to develop in ways that I couldn’t necessarily plan out in the beginning. For example, recently I have begun to focus more on the tension between painting as an object in a space and painting as an object that defines an internal space. This intensified focus has caused my paintings to become more sculptural, more object oriented. What I am interested in is the development of a painted experience, not the illustration of an experience painted.